Close

asana

Online Yoga Anatomy Mentorship

upward facing dog, urdhva dhanurasana, side plank, vasistasana, obliques, yoga anatomy

Our signature Online Yoga Anatomy Mentorship is OPEN! To read more or to register, click here. Make sure to subscribe to our newsletter to receive reminders, and to hear about related webinars: http://eepurl.com/bsvgRn

Read More

Yoga Anatomy Weekend in Pittsburgh, PA

yoga anatomy

Join Dr. Ariele Foster for a weekend of anatomy-based yoga at Yoga Hive in Pittsburgh, PA: Way of the Happy Fascia (Saturday Nov 10, 10am-12pm) Posterior Chain Awakening (Saturday Nov 10, 2pm-4pm) MASTER CLASS: The Goddess and the Grasshopper (Sunday Nov 11, 10am-12pm) — Way of the Happy Fascia: Using simply 2 tennis balls, learn […]

Read More

5 Actions to Get Your Foot Up Between Your Hands

stepping your foot between your hands in yoga, from downward facing dog or down dog

The Instagram is full of fluid movers, yogis who can gracefully place a foot between their hands in slow motion, usually on the way down from a single arm hand balancing feat with a glass of wine between their toes. Not a drop spilled. What is less common: actual instructions in yoga class on how […]

Read More

Do We Serve the Poses or Do the Poses Serve Us? (Science Yoga Sundays episode)

Julie Tran of Science Yoga Sundays graciously invited me to speak on her program. I chose a topic that has been on my mind a LOT lately — Are we serving the yoga or is the yoga serving us? “We are here to enhance our lives, we are not here to bow down to some […]

Read More

Fluidity and Fascia: an Anatomy Workshop (Richmond, VA)

Fascia is both fluid and form-giving, containing and allowing. It knits together and enrobes the body, and its role is often unrecognized in the practice of yoga asana. Because it also helps organize body sense, it contributes to seamless transitions between poses, gracefulness, balance, and deep interconnectivity with the nervous system.  Healthy, vibrant fascia allows […]

Read More

Any Yoga Pose Can Harm, Any Yoga Pose Can Heal

yoga injury, harm from yoga, is yoga good for you

One of the first principles of teaching anatomically sound asana is this: Any yoga pose can harm; Any yoga pose can heal. For example, Tadasana (Mountain Pose) can reinforce poor postural habits, or it can build strength. Headstand is likely to cause excess pressure on cervical vertebrae, but may also be a skillful way to […]

Read More

Anatomy & Biomechanics Mini-Intensive (CEUs) (Rockville, MD)

Join Dr. Ariele Foster, physical therapist and interdisciplinary yoga teacher, for a deep anatomy refresher for asana studies with current teachers, dedicated students and yoga teachers-to-be. Learning anatomy can and should be playful, fun and applicable to your yoga practice or yoga teaching. This mini-Intensive will explore: – 10 Principles of Anatomy-Informed Yoga Teaching (or Practice) […]

Read More

The Hidden Pulling Actions in Chaturanga or The Problem is Never the Pose

Amid the growing awareness that yoga asana is not always an infallible and complete physical workout, has been a tendency to dismiss certain poses (for example: wild thing, sleeping pigeon, chaturanga) as culprits of injury. The real culprit In reality, the culprits of injury — no matter the physical pursuit — are excessive repetition of movement […]

Read More

Three Elements of Intelligent Sequencing

Yoga Anatomy Academy is about to throw down (a.k.a. post) our first yoga sequence on this blog. We thought we’d preface it with a behind the scenes break-down of how we think through creating a sequence. There are as many ways to sequence a yoga class (or personal practice) as there are individuals practicing yoga, and we have so […]

Read More

7 Reasons Your Heels Don’t Touch the Floor in Downward Dog

lengthen achilles yoga

Have you been practicing yoga for a while, and feel frustrated that you can’t get your heels to the floor in downward facing dog pose? There are a few reasons why heels-to-floor may not be happening for you. First let’s remember that Downward Facing Dog demands a ton of joint motion: approximately 45 degrees of ankle dorsiflexion (top of […]

Read More