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Yoga Journal Online Course “Fascia Release for Yoga”

fascia release yoga, yogis, myofascial release, online self myofascial release, online course yoga fascia

Join Dr. Ariele Foster in her online course with Yoga Journal “Fascia Release for Yoga”. This powerful, start-anytime, 6-week online course (with a community engagement component) shows how myofascial release (fascia release) is a great compliment to your yoga practice. What is Fascia Fascia is your body’s three-dimensional connective tissue matrix. It encases and weaves […]

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WORKSHOP: Biomechanics of the Shoulder Girdle (Washington, DC)

yoga shoulder strength handstand anatomy tips

Shoulder strength in yoga: The shoulder girdle is comprised of 6 classical joints, and two pseudo-joints. Because of its complexity, yoga asana instruction often oversimplifies important actions in this region. Since we spend significant time placing weight through the hands and therefore the shoulders in yoga, and it’s wise to be informed. In this workshop, […]

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Malasana: How to Overcome the Struggle in the Deep Yoga Squat

how to get into garland pose deep squat butt to heels

Here’s a comprehensive guide to getting more comfortable in Malasana Plus, if you scroll down far enough, 7 Steps to Better Ankle Mobility We at Yoga Anatomy Academy love malasana and are on a mission to make this deep squat more accessible to more humans. The motivation is this: a large chunk of what we […]

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Yoga Anatomy Weekend in Pittsburgh, PA

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Join Dr. Ariele Foster for a weekend of anatomy-based yoga at Yoga Hive in Pittsburgh, PA: Way of the Happy Fascia (Saturday Nov 10, 10am-12pm) Posterior Chain Awakening (Saturday Nov 10, 2pm-4pm) MASTER CLASS: The Goddess and the Grasshopper (Sunday Nov 11, 10am-12pm) — Way of the Happy Fascia: Using simply 2 tennis balls, learn […]

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5 Actions to Get Your Foot Up Between Your Hands

stepping your foot between your hands in yoga, from downward facing dog or down dog

The Instagram is full of fluid movers, yogis who can gracefully place a foot between their hands in slow motion, usually on the way down from a single arm hand balancing feat with a glass of wine between their toes. Not a drop spilled. What is less common: actual instructions in yoga class on how […]

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Two Tips for Rotator Cuff Strengthening in Yoga

The rotator cuff (RTC) is a well-known group of muscles that are important in stabilizing the shoulder, basically no matter the activity. When it comes to keeping the arm bone centered in the “socket”, these are the guys for the job. The larger the weight or force that an arm lifts, the more important the […]

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Balancing the Science & the Mystery in Yoga

Teaching anatomy for yoga practitioners is about much more than relaying the nuts and bolts (muscles and bones). In order to understand anatomy in the context of the vastness of yoga, we must understand how yoga, yoga classes, and yoga teaching influence bodies and fit in to a larger conversation about the intersection of yoga […]

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Do We Serve the Poses or Do the Poses Serve Us? (Science Yoga Sundays episode)

Julie Tran of Science Yoga Sundays graciously invited me to speak on her program. I chose a topic that has been on my mind a LOT lately — Are we serving the yoga or is the yoga serving us? “We are here to enhance our lives, we are not here to bow down to some […]

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Yoga Anatomy to the People: a Manifesto

In case you haven’t noticed, yoga is undergoing a revolution. This revolution is a natural ricochet from dominant paradigms of physical asana practice that have included: 1) overly prescriptive alignment and/or 2) lack of alignment plus excess repetition, but that 3) in nearly all cases discouraged critical thinking, deviation from your teacher, and incorporating modern […]

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The Hidden Pulling Actions in Chaturanga or The Problem is Never the Pose

Amid the growing awareness that yoga asana is not always an infallible and complete physical workout, has been a tendency to dismiss certain poses (for example: wild thing, sleeping pigeon, chaturanga) as culprits of injury. The real culprit In reality, the culprits of injury — no matter the physical pursuit — are excessive repetition of movement […]

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